Billy McDougall

Billy resided at Lake Tyers and was an informant for John Bulmer. Bulmer wrote positively about McDougall in his annual reports, noting he was cultivating food and working with Dick Cooper to split wood for fences and houses around the station. McDougall and his wife Emma had a number of children, some of whom died as infants of pneumonia and bronchitis, a situation that must have been heartbreaking for the couple.
McDougall was granted a certificate to work off the station, in accordance with the 1871 regulations determining that work certificates granted by the station managers were required for Aboriginal people to be employed off station.
He died in June 1884, aged only 45, of heart disease.
References:
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Twentieth Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1884, p. 12
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Eighth Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1872, p. 30.
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Seventh Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1871, p. 17.
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Thirteenth Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1877, p. 8.
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Seventeenth Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1881, p. 9.
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Eighteenth Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1882, p. 12
Board for the Protection of the Aborigines, Twenty-First Report, John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne, 1885, p. 11

Found in Transcriptions